Yesterday upon the stair I saw a TV set that wasn’t there


Mustela nivalis

“BBC could get power to access private data”, the Telegraph informs us. In that article, we also find:

“The review also suggests that new legislation could be introduced to prosecute anyone who fails to inform authorities that they don’t have a television.”

What else do I have to inform them of? That I don’t own a Ferrari? A Rolex? A globe with internal day/night lighting? (I had one of those once but it grew legs and moved to some unknown other place.)

I confess that I also don’t have a weasel. That is, I’ve got a stuffed one, but I hope that doesn’t count. Because I haven’t informed the “authorities”.

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13 comments

  • The BBC tax (the so called “license fee”) is a vile, indeed evil, thing. It should be abolished at once – then they would have no “need” for this private information.

    However, regulations ensure that the private radio and television stations have the same collectivist, university crowd, political position as the BBC.

    Ronald Reagan introduced some freedom into American radio – allowing shows that did not have the standard “liberal left” political line that is falsely presented as “objective” and “unbiased” (the brainwashing project that goes all the way back to the collectivist “Progressive” movement with their “Schools of Journalism” to promote “scientific” journalism), but there was no such action here – none.

    Radio and television stations here all have the same political opinions – they have to by the regulations.

    Still getting rid of the BBC tax would still be a good thing.

    • In this was truly the case, then the Tories must be part of the “the same collectivist, university crowd” because they’ve not touched the BBC, and barely dented the state… I believe it is unhelpful to view the UK through the bipolar lens of ‘progressive’ and ‘conservative’, when they’re all really part of the same top-down authoritarian establishment. Even UKIP seems unwilling to challenge the monopoly of the BBpC, or even the general status quo.

      • As it happens, I’ve just written an essay on exactly this subject. I sent it to Sean last Monday, but he hasn’t responded, so I assume he’s away. But you can find it in another of my domains:

        http://www.libertarian.to/NewsDta/templates/news1.php?art=art3840

        • Most people must fall within the ‘confused’ category then :-). My point is really that when their self-interest is threatened; both elements of the more traditional and progressive establishment will band together… There are also high-court judges who hold both traditional and progressive views etc., so clear-cut definitions hardly apply, and I can’t imagine a Tory run council welcoming cuts to its budget.

        • OK I will have a look.

  • I was considering buying a TV ‘combi’ just for playing DVDs. New legislation could make this complicated… The fact that the establishment is still willing to use draconian measures to prop up the BBpC, shows what a necessary system of control it is to them.

  • Well, what we could all do, all 20-odd million homes, is “inform the authorities” that none of us, not one, now owns a Wireless Tele Vision. I’m sure that there’s enough broken TV sets lying about everywhere that a convincing assault on “council recycling locations” would produce quite credible mountains of dead TV hardware. They can have about a third of a skipload from my garden alone.

    This would force the said “authorities” to hurriedly change the law, probably badly, to be able to execute general search warrants to enter homes and investigate the existence or otherwise of working Tellies; something they currently can’t do.

    They can’t possibly prosecute everyone. And merely “seizing the televisions” would (a) defeat the object of having an awful outfit like the BBC, and (b) clog up I can’t guess how much space and land with the useless gadgets.

    The parallels with penalties for owning typewriters or photocopiers behind the Iron Curtain pre-1989 would become obvious, even to observers in the Chinese government.

    • “The parallels with penalties for owning typewriters or photocopiers behind the Iron Curtain pre-1989 would become obvious, even to observers in the Chinese government.”

      Unfortunately, the joy of watching Eastenders for millions trumps the desire to overthrow totalitarianism. If only the Soviets had dreamt up compelling soaps that appeal to the lowest common denominator…

      • Well, the Soviets were mere amateurs, weren’t they, in the soaps department. But they did dream up some, especially the Polish Communists. And some of them were brilliant; let me show you this one here…

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Czterej_pancerni_i_pies

        But I expect that post-WW2-Soviet-bloc-television was of the “improving” kind in general, rather than pandering to “popular culture”. You have only to look at the DPRK’s Youtube channel to see the current stuff.

        Here’s an example;

        • On The Busses with tanks – what a masterstroke!

          DPRK using western social media? Capitalist scum.

  • I posted my license back to them about a year ago now, and canceled my direct debit. I stream TV via a Roku box now, and have a Netflix account. After taking into account the payback time for the Roku box and the Netfix subscription, I’m still about £10 a month better off, and my kids aren’t accidentally subjected to BBC propaganda. Much better, and totally within the current law, as long as you are not watching broadcast TV!

    I’m surprised I’ve not had a visit from a man with an ID badge and a clipboard yet. Shame, I was looking forward to it.

  • I find it shameful that the BBC is now behaving in a way one would only describe as ‘Cultural Marxist’.

    For years, the British public have been paying the TV license only for the BBC to supply left wing and cultural marxist rubbish that we have been seeing for the last 30-40 years and I am starting to believe that the more people don’t pay the license and instead watch catch-up TV.

    If we do have another Labour government come in, it is more than likely that they will give more powers to the BBC and even force people who don’t even have TV’s to pay the license fee. This was recommended by the current BBC Director General Lord Hall and it is something we have to stop if we are to start regaining our liberties.

    I certainly believe that if we can’t abolish the BBC, we can at least abolish the license fee and have them stand on their own two feet. I also believe that OFCOM should only be used as a complaint department and not as a regulations body to suit their own political ideologies so that we can have free and fair TV regardless of anybody’s political positions.

    • Just stop paying the bastards, and then lie back and see what happens. That’s really now the only way forward.
      If the GranmscoFabiaNazis execute exemplary prosecutions and punishments, then at least we will all know where we stand.

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