WHY IS THE UK SO INCOMPATIBLE WITH THE REST OF THE EU?


Ronald Olden

The common feature of the coalition of voters which came together to support Brexit is that we all want democracy in some form or another. It’s a state of mind. We each have radically different ideas of what ‘democracy’ actually is. Some of us, including other Libertarian Alliance sympathisers, see the other’s definition of ‘democracy’ as ‘fascism and dictatorship’. Others as ‘corporatism or communism’.  Yet others, as poimntless ineffective liberalism.

But all of Brexit voters instinctively know, that the idea that anything resembling freedom, democracy, or government by consent, can exist in any environment other than a nation state of manageable proportions, is laughable.

Many continentals don’t see it like this. And from their perspective they are correct. Their recent history is of dictatorship, often cruel, so they think that the best they can hope for is the miniscule degree of democracy and freedom that the EU doles out. In their position I might think the same.

But this is Britain. We haven’t lived like that for hundreds of years. Periods of actual dictatorship in UK history have been rare and short and even then, from the point of view of the peasant in the field, something of an irrelevance. But the emotions run deep in out British mind. The legend of Robin Hood is more about resistance to the (then), recently imposed Norman rule as it is about men in tights cavorting in the forest.

I for example, abhor Corbyn and the Labour Party. But at least I know that if they are in power in a Nation State with it’s own money, there’s a chance I can get rid of them. It’s the same for them. But if you are part of a multi state federation and monetary union there’s no hope of removing your own government. You no longer live in the hope at least, of getting the kind of society you want. Ask the people of Greece.

The blunt truth is, I am willing to accept that my fellow Briton can vote me down, but I am not willing to accept that someone outside the UK can do so. That’s why many who had not voted before, and might not vote again, were willing to make sure they voted for Brexit. They are usually willing to leave political decisions to their neighbours, but they are not willing to leave decisions up to foreigners. They might be apathetic as to who wins elections. But they are not apathetic about retaining democracy itself.

I myself experience this emotion. I particularly dislike the Lib Dems, because although they are much closer to my way of thinking than Corbyn, (and for that metter social conservatives), I fear that they don’t value democracy. I can have a vote to remove Nick Clegg from office, and if I fail, I fail. So be it. But that right has been lost if am governed by thousands of other unelected Nick Clegg clones deriving their authority from the EU.

Democracy and self determination might, to greater or lesser extent, be an illusion, but, when we can see that we might occasionally be able to win an election which affects a change of leader who’s saying something radically different, they are illusions which sustain us. That’s why these international superstates are, unless he can impose order by force, doomed to fail.

Merely voting for Trump and seeing him win, has been a tonic for many American, (and for many elsewhere) and leaves us satisfied. It’s like when, once in a generation, our miserable local football team wins a game agaiast a more successful one. We don’t actually have to like the players.  Does it really matter? Yes it does. If our little team has merged with the bigger one we have nothing. Not even hope. It might not matter if Trump us unable to deliver much of what he’s promised

It’s the same with Brexit. Sometimes seeing our smug opponents defeated is reward in itself. Even if freedom and independence is an illusion, many of us prefer to risk being a little bit poorer but free and independent, as opposed to living in a Gilded Cage. No doubt many slaves are better off than many free people. But it’s not a condition any of us are ever satisfied with And the less we have to lose the more likely we are to take the risk.

Materialist ‘liberals’ and socialists will never understand these emotions. That’s why they call us stupid. In their terms perhaps we are. But we have values and a dimension to our thinking, that they don’t. We are possessed of the gift of living with these ideas day in day out. In the end, the remainers have nothing.

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6 comments

  • Pingback: WHY IS THE UK SO INCOMPATIBLE WITH THE REST OF THE EU? | The Libertarian Alliance Blog | rudolfwordpressblog

  • Dear Mr Olden,
    “I doubt if any two people could agree on a definition of democracy”, so said a learned barrister with whom I corresponded many years ago.
    So unless we can agree on what it is and what it is not we are stuffed? However, clearly your heart is in the right place and you care deeply about England as I do..

    To answer the question in the title of your argument; during the Brexit debate I circulated my own document entitled “What the EU debate is really all about” and it started with the following words:

    ” The EU referendum debate, whilst it has been turned into one revolving largely around the economy and trade, is fundamentally a battle between two opposing legal systems, that of England and that of the EU……..examine the degree to which the English Common Law system has been breached by the other system, to the danger of the British people”.

    I explained what advantages the Common Law system had over the continental system and showed that the EU system was a Soviet-style system of government, confirmed not only by Guy Verhofstadt but by the Russian dissident Vladimir Bukovsky and intended to be this from the start so that the satellite countries of the former Soviet Union could be more easily merged when the time came. Remember that in the1970’s the “fear of communism” was used to drive us into the EC.

    I would be more than happy to e-mail a copy to anyone who links via http://www.camrecon.demon.co.uk
    I can also supply a copy of an article by Torquil Dick-Eriksen entitled “Magna Carta and Europe” which to my mind leaves no doubt as to which side of the Channnel we hold allegiance.

    Our next problem is in that word allegiance, in that the person or persons to whom, we are told, we ought to bear allegiance,( and to whom all our MPs etc swear an oath), have betrayed us and broken the laws of England.

    Indeed, this suspect word “democracy” was the means whereby our treacherous Mr Heath and other politicians having been empowered by a “democratic majority” then chose to disregard the laws of England and force the Queen to break Her Solemn Coronation Oath in 1953 to “govern according to our laws and customs”. However, it is we, the voters of England, who in our ignorance
    of the true nature of “democracy” have become our own executioners in that we consent to the unlawful “convention” that the Monarch must act on the advice of Her Minister, no matter how treasonable that advice.

    So in view of the catastrophe which “democracy” has visited upon us I would love to think that Mr Olden and others would give the word rather more attention than a passing shrug by visiting my website and then getting in touch. The links are working and the silence is heart-breaking because divided we fall. It is our personal liberty which is under terminal threat from “democracy” which is merely the main tool of the oppressors, the “democratic” party system being the “revolution against the LEGAL English constitution”………………………The whole thing is a matter of whose laws we obey and why their system is totally incompatible with our sense of liberty.

  • Because the UK is empiricist – and has been since Robert Grossteste – whereas the continent is rationalist.

    • For the benefit of my fellow ignorami

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Grosseteste

  • Smart comments on this blog, especially the reference to the Bishop of Lincoln though I would say he wasn’t the first (the – and continentally influenced! – Hereford School of the 12th century, for example…?). To address Mr Roland’s article, your allusion to “The legend of Robin Hood is more about resistance to the (then), recently imposed Norman rule as it is about men in tights cavorting in the forest” really is quite a grosstesticular simplification of a veritable palimpsest of dirty jokes and bar-room brawls, half forgotten stories, and the usual ‘chansons de geste’ floating about various ‘courts of love’, most of which have nothing to do with the implied resistance to the ‘Norman Yokel’ and more to do with various actors who were well aware of the complexities of the world they were trying to scrape a living in. Much like these times, they played it up to suit their audience in every encroachment of the king’s forest they got waylaid by foresters looking to make a quick buck.

    As for “It’s the same with Brexit. Sometimes seeing our smug opponents defeated is reward in itself. Even if freedom and independence is an illusion, many of us prefer to risk being a little bit poorer but free and independent, as opposed to living in a Gilded Cage. No doubt many slaves are better off than many free people. But it’s not a condition any of us are ever satisfied with And the less we have to lose the more likely we are to take the risk.”

    If the EU is your Vanity Fair sir, then Brexit has to be my Castle Doubt, and if you don’t mind I’d rather not get imprisoned there by Giant Despair. That is, of course, if you don’t mind someone’s opinion who has some sympathy for Liberal Democrats on the matter, and is still trying to make sense all this teeth-grinding.

    • Wot he sed.

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