Category Archives: Groan

Savoring Hillary’s Vow Of Silence


By Ilana Mercer

The national media are sulking. Hillary Clinton won’t speak to them. But what is it about this power-hungry dirigista that the media don’t already know?

Prior to taking a vow of silence, Mrs. Clinton promised to make President Obama’s legislation by executive action with respect to immigration seem like child’s play; a “DREAMers” delight, if you will.

Where’s the mystery there?

Big Media know full-well about—and have just about forgiven—Madam Secretary’s habit of conducting state affairs via private server, later scrubbed clean of unflattering or incriminating communications. Read more

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Mr. Cheese’s Cabinet



Neil’s Note: Rather than bombard you with a diatribe about why I (and you) shouldn’t vote, I’ll give you my anticipations – before the fact – of how the 2010 election would turn out. I don’t think I was far off. Except, perhaps, that Mr Pryer turned out to be a Mrs.

This time? I have no idea. Except that all the politicians will be dishonest as usual, and that all human beings in the islands I call Brutesville will be even worse oppressed after than we were before. Read more

Godfrey Bloom, Speech to the Swinton Circle, April 2015


Godfrey Bloom

It is always a pleasure to come and speak to the Swinton Circle, although not the easiest of tasks, like the Cambridge University Conservative Association or Mises Institute the audiences are some of the most informed in the world, the same problem when writing for Breibart or Libertarian Alliance. An expert audience makes it difficult to add value; you risk people going home thinking ‘I knew all that’. So it is often a case of emphasis or revision or simply a new angle. It is inevitable that many of our views are subjective. I remember in Cambridge giving an opinion on same-sex marriage. A post graduate suggested that Nozick would not have agreed with me, well as Bogart said in The Big Sleep when criticised over his manners, ‘I sit up at night grieving over them’. Who knows whether he would agree with me or not? Read more

Godfrey Bloom on The Behaviour of Modern Children


Godfrey Bloom

A few weeks ago there was one of those ‘storm in teacup rows which somehow capture the imagination. An eminent violinist, Kwa Wha  Chung, a lady of great ability and old world Asian courtesy was driven to exasperation by a child in the front row coughing fit to bust. Performing, I gather a sensitive  violin concerto the mood and enjoyment was ruined by this unfortunate child.  The virtuoso performer laid down the bow and suggested from the podium the parent brought the child back when she was older.

To me, as a music lover, and erstwhile associate of The English Sinfonia, where I first met the violinist in the 70’s, I am at a loss to understand how any sensible parent could have let the situation get so out of hand. Moreover Classic FM who ran the story took a straw poll of listeners claimed opinion was equally divided in the support of the performer.

Leaving aside the minutiae of this incident, I was not there, it begs the question ‘is the child always given the benefit of the doubt’? It appears to me, over the years there is a growing definitive order of merit in assessing behaviour of the citizen by ‘society’ or society as defined by those who make such assessments, usually self-appointed, certainly self-important, the great and the good completely divorced it would seem from the proverbial man on the Clapham Omnibus ( or Joe Sixpack if you prefer ).

The top of the pecking order would seem to be children, or ‘yoof’ if you prefer. Strongly followed by cyclists whose arrogance for many knows no bounds, certainly not the Highway Code. You can add your own Read more

The ‘We Need To Have A Conversation’ Malarkey


Ilana Mercer

You know just how scholarly a policy paper is when it is studded with a clichéd expression like “we need to have a conversation about …” The pop-phrase is familiar from these farcical usages:

“We need to have a conversation about race”—when, in reality, we do nothing but subject ourselves to a one-way browbeating about imagined slights committed against the pigmentally burdened. Read more

The matter of flying and “the war on terror”; Andreas Lubitz, his problems, Germanwings and so on


David Davis

I have been wondering quietly to myself for a few days since Tuesday, and the news that a bloke deliberately locked his fellow Flying-Officer out of the cockpit and crashed the entire plane into a mountainside at the speed of an air-rifle bullet, about the strategic wisdom of measures taken by our supposed “leaders” in regard to what they call “The War On Terror”.

I will not make an anodyne speech about how “our thoughts are with the victims and their families” for

(a) they are anyway, and

(b) it’s anodyne corporate wallpaper when said in this way (you might just pray to God instead if it makes things better or at least less awful, and which you can) and

(c) all the Public-EnemyClass-GramscoFabiaNazis say this crap when they are trying to cover up something and they don’t mean it a toss anyway, being bad people a-priori; so they’ve devalued it. So I shan’t do it.

Now then, to The Main Business.

There can be no such thing as a “War On Terror”. How do you wage war against a tactic of war, or a “strategic objective”? You can only wage a war on the actual people that execute at least one of a range of different tactics or strategies.

It so far appears that the door to the cockpit of this sadly-doomed plane possessed locking devices strong enough to prevent breaching with an axe. In the wake of 9/11 this seems all very well, but doesn’t take account of probabilities far far higher than an armed hijack by pre-capitalist-barbarian nerds (you all know who there are) armed with stanley-knives. Such higher probabilities must, it seems, include pilots with mental problems serious enough to put their “fitness to fly” in question – regardless of the level of skills they have.

It appears that these locking devices could be commanded from inside the cockpit; and also then _not_ by a flight-deck officer outside it who could then not override them.

The obvious way round this problem, if our “masters” believe that armed air-hijacking is a real threat, and that there is actually what they call a “war on terror” (the need for such a war is indeed rather arguable doubtful) is to do one or else more of the following things, in light of the fact that it’s pretty hard to take, say a Bren Gun or other “medium machine gun” (or even a 0.5″ rifle) into the passenger compartment of an airliner:- Read more

George Formby in Child Sex Allegations


Comic Icons: George Formby(AP) – London, 3rd June 2013: The body of deceased comedian George Formby should be exhumed, to see if he was the notorious “Rock Man,” says Moira Perge of the KidS care! charity.

In recent days, the British show business community has been rocked by allegations that Formby, who died in 1961, was a violent paedophile who abused children as young as two days old at the top of Blackpool Tower. A woman, who cannot be identified for legal reasons, claims she suffered abuse over a four day period in 1932. “He touched me, he did,” the victim told the Associated Press from her bed in a Birkenhead care home. “I’m sure it was him. I’ll never forget his leering face as he held the stick of rock in his hand. Ooh, it was right disgusting what he done to me. He ruined me life, I think.” Read more

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