Tag Archives: conservative Party

Leave, Actually – What the Election Means


Leave, Actually – What the Election Means

By Duncan Whitmore

“Tidings of Comfort of Joy” – so heralded the front page of The Daily Telegraph during their vision of Boris Johnson’s election victory descending from heaven with a chorus of angels. Certainly the magnitude of Johnson’s achievement is difficult to overstate. Not only has he propelled the Conservatives to an impressive parliamentary majority by robbing Labour of seats in its traditional working class heartlands; he has also, in a few short months, purged the Tories of their wrangling over Europe which has plagued each of their party leaders since Margaret Thatcher. For libertarians, however, while the result of last Thursday’s poll brings much comfort, the joy may have to be put on ice for a while.

There is comfort in the fact that, for the third election in a row – two general, one European – the British people have reaffirmed their 2016 decision to leave the European Union. No longer can dyed-in-the-wool Remainers claim that the electorate did not know what they were voting for, given that the precise form of Brexit was there for all to see in the text of Johnson’s withdrawal agreement. In the end, the possible split of the Leave vote between the Conservatives and the Brexit Party failed to materialise. Instead, as Nigel Farage intended, his party contributed to the fall of Labour in working class constituencies while the Tory vote remained intact. In some of the most surprising Tory victories – for example, in Durham Northwest, Blyth Valley, Bassetlaw, Bishop Auckland and Bolsover (where Dennis Skinner was unseated after nearly fifty years) – the spoils from Labour losses were parcelled out between the Brexit Party and the Tories, allowing the latter to accomplish anything between narrow and landslide victories over Labour. Although, according to Wednesday’s Times, some studies have claimed that the Brexit Party actually deprived the Conservatives of around twenty further seats, this is no bad thing. For in spite of gaining only 2% of the vote nationally and no seats, Farage’s combination of help and hindrance to the Tories has paid off by decimating the prospect of any parliamentary “Remainer” alliance while also neutering Conservative complacency. Of course, the precise unfolding of Brexit – i.e. the final form of Johnson’s withdrawal agreement and the eventual results of negotiations over the trade deal – remains to be seen. But the prospect of a second referendum leading to the outright cancellation of the decision to leave has finally been buried. Read more

Mrs May’s Disastrous Deal


Mrs May’s Disastrous Deal

By Duncan Whitmore

Albeit for the wrong reasons, Theresa May never ceases to amaze. In spite of having first tabled an almost universally unpopular proposal for withdrawal from the EU at Chequers in July of this year, and then having done the equivalent of inject that proposal with steroids through the draft “Withdrawal Agreement” with the EU, she soldiers on in the face of all resistance.

Sean Gabb has summarised the contents of the draft agreement unveiled last week in an earlier post on this blog so there is no need to repeat that here. What we will do instead is to outline the combination of circumstances that have led to this situation and conclude with some thoughts as to what libertarians can make of this whole this debacle. Read more

Cameron imitating Blair: huge mistake (all will come undone fully, in 2015)


David Davis

It is perhaps too much to hope that UKIP or even the LPUK will be returned to Parliament with a landslide majority in 2010. Other factors apart, ZanuLieBorg will certainly rig the results: it is the job of Jihadist-GramscoFabiaNazis to do just this thing: it is called participative democracy. If not in anti-Labour seats and other enemy-marginals, then certainly in their Rotten and Pocket Boroughs of which they have about  300, which is quite enough for a majority if well-stuffed, and with a bit of luck in others.

But Dave “the Prole” Cameron is storing up potentially-terminal trouble for himself and his party, to some extent right now, but definitely for 4/5 years’ time if he does what Simon Heffer is accusing him of.

This blog does not favour a Tory government…..(and WTF does “post-modern” mean? I do not know)


…..but it favours the continuation of a Labour government even less positively than that.

David Davis

What we would like is a LPUK government (despite the fact that the LA takes no party-political position on this matter) or, in default of that, a UKIP one which nasty Libertariano-Gramsistio-inverted-Marxists like me could, slightly possibly, subvert and direct into libertarian paths rather more easily than we could direct the policies of the LPUK or certainly of the Tory party (discuss….I relish the fireworks.)

However, there could be a General Election in 2009: but I doubt it. If there is, Gordon Brown could still win, or at least Guido thinks so. The risk is there.

Guido thinks that there’s a probability of another 3/4/5 (whatever) years of Zanulieborg. What libertarians have to consider, at least who think that the continuing existence of Britain not only as a (now failed but headless-chicken-walking) state but as a home of liberty and the birthplace of libertarian philosophy, er, matters, is whether it’d be better if Labour won?

Are there still enough active and angry liberals (call them Whigs, whatever, who cares) to make a difference the next time round, so that we could conceivably rescue ourselves by some revolutionary means which I cannot right now imagine, from another session of Labour/Nazi tyranny……..?

……..Or, would we prefer even a possibly short spell of “conservatism” – which we of course would view not very differently from full-blown Statism, which it will still resemble – in order to slow the slideage into the political/tyrannist cesspit enough for, say, the Indians or the Chinese to rescue us?

I know that when Chris Tame died, he said that didn’t think there were enough classical liberals left to make a difference any more, and that he was rather pessimistic about the prospects for liberty. I hope he was wrong.

But if the Tories lose, again, in 2009 or 2010, what then will YOU do? What will become of “Jacqui” “Smith” ?

I can’t believe that someone who looks like that and talks like that and says the things which it does, is a real personette. I just can’t. Sorry. It’s a construct; probably “post modern”, whatever that term means. I don’t know. Really. Really. I have not even looked it up, I am so terrified of what I might find.

What is “post-modernism? Please could the commentariat tell me for I do not know?

And so we enter the Long Dark Night of un-liberalism


David Davis

Once upon a time, there were members of the Libertarian Alliance who thought it would be possible, and that indeed the day would come, and soon, when we could capture the British Conservative Party. This was to be the way forward: getting libertarian ideas and policies into the normal high-level political discourse of a major modern state.

Therein, we thought, lay our best hope for confronting the pre-capitalist-barbarians, fascists, other lefties, Gramsco-Marxians, and all the other fellow-travelling worthless sub-human murderous trash which we knew even then was bent on infecting and corrupting our institutions, especially the schools and universities. We could make all these uncouth monsters irrelevant. But the damage to these institutions, and the traditions which they enshrined, has been done, and it is probably too late to fix and repair the loss of our culture’s and civilisation’s volume distribution in our population’s folk-memory.

Clearly, whatever opportunity to hijack a good major party may have ever existed, has been lost. Patrick over at the UK Libertarian Party puts it much better than I can: David Cameron not only can’t change anything much, but he also does not really want to.

If Gordon Brown and the Tories both carry on the way they are, Cameron will probably win a majority at the next election, whenever it may occur. But let’s not expect any miracles therafter.

Let’s preserve what can be saved, through the night, and survive, and perhaps even sometimes laugh, if allowed, when nobody is looking.