Tag Archives: Labour party

Leave, Actually – What the Election Means


Leave, Actually – What the Election Means

By Duncan Whitmore

“Tidings of Comfort of Joy” – so heralded the front page of The Daily Telegraph during their vision of Boris Johnson’s election victory descending from heaven with a chorus of angels. Certainly the magnitude of Johnson’s achievement is difficult to overstate. Not only has he propelled the Conservatives to an impressive parliamentary majority by robbing Labour of seats in its traditional working class heartlands; he has also, in a few short months, purged the Tories of their wrangling over Europe which has plagued each of their party leaders since Margaret Thatcher. For libertarians, however, while the result of last Thursday’s poll brings much comfort, the joy may have to be put on ice for a while.

There is comfort in the fact that, for the third election in a row – two general, one European – the British people have reaffirmed their 2016 decision to leave the European Union. No longer can dyed-in-the-wool Remainers claim that the electorate did not know what they were voting for, given that the precise form of Brexit was there for all to see in the text of Johnson’s withdrawal agreement. In the end, the possible split of the Leave vote between the Conservatives and the Brexit Party failed to materialise. Instead, as Nigel Farage intended, his party contributed to the fall of Labour in working class constituencies while the Tory vote remained intact. In some of the most surprising Tory victories – for example, in Durham Northwest, Blyth Valley, Bassetlaw, Bishop Auckland and Bolsover (where Dennis Skinner was unseated after nearly fifty years) – the spoils from Labour losses were parcelled out between the Brexit Party and the Tories, allowing the latter to accomplish anything between narrow and landslide victories over Labour. Although, according to Wednesday’s Times, some studies have claimed that the Brexit Party actually deprived the Conservatives of around twenty further seats, this is no bad thing. For in spite of gaining only 2% of the vote nationally and no seats, Farage’s combination of help and hindrance to the Tories has paid off by decimating the prospect of any parliamentary “Remainer” alliance while also neutering Conservative complacency. Of course, the precise unfolding of Brexit – i.e. the final form of Johnson’s withdrawal agreement and the eventual results of negotiations over the trade deal – remains to be seen. But the prospect of a second referendum leading to the outright cancellation of the decision to leave has finally been buried. Read more

Economic Myths #14 – Share the Wealth


Economic Myths #14 – Share the Wealth

By Duncan Whitmore

Clement Attlee is, with little doubt, one of the more notable of Britain’s former Prime Ministers. Apart from the long lasting effects of his legacy he was, in 2004, voted the “Greatest British Prime Minister of the Twentieth Century” in a poll of 139 academics.

Needless to say, with such a high ranking in academic circles, almost every “accomplishment” of the post-war government that he led (with the possible exception of decolonisation) is likely to be an anathema to libertarians. Not only did he nationalise key industries such as the railways, canals, road haulage, coal mining, gas, electricity, telephones and steel manufacturing, he practically created the “cradle-to-grave” welfare state, the jewel in the crown of which was the now untouchable sacred cow, the National Health Service. Furthermore, he successfully entrenched the “Keynesian consensus” – the idea that full employment would be maintained by Keynesian fiscal policy – that was to unite all parties of any stripe for the three decades ending with the election of Margaret Thatcher’s government.

With such profound and fundamental changes to British society, many of which are still felt today, it is important to have an insight into Attlee’s motivations towards the legislation that his government passed. Read more

Jeremy Corbyn: A View from the Right


Jeremy Corbyn:
A View from the Right
by Sean Gabb
27th August 2018

One of my books
Learn More

Seen from my point of view, on the libertarian right, there are at least three ways of looking at the alleged or real anti-semitism of Jeremy Corbyn. The first is that it is very, very funny. Since the 1970s, he and his friends have been whining about the horrors of racial prejudice. Now, every time he opens his mouth, he says something that upsets Jews – and that may legitimately be of concern to them. You tell me it is uncharitable if I fail to keep a straight face. The second is that the scandal is a distraction from the real issue in British politics. Next March, we are supposed to leave the European Union. Whether we shall or ought to leave with some kind of agreement is arguably more important than with whom Mr Corbyn shared a platform at the Conway Hall in 1987. These first two being noted, I will focus on the third, which is what impact he will have on the so far arrested realignment of English politics. Read more

Diane Abbott for “Labour” leader


David Davis

As I have often said on Facebook, it is of no account whatever who is the leader of the “Labour Party”, since it will try to do the same thing over and over again regardless – which is to say: burn down and destroy what semblence of liberalism still exists in the UK.

It must, simply, be shut down and its hard disks malleted, before it can continue to exist to do yet more damage to liberty in the world.

But although people are rating her as a 3%-cert or less, I think all support should be given to her. That will ensure that Labour is unelectable for at least three years.

GOSH this will be fun to watch – POLITICAL STREET THEATRE –


Micheal Winning

Too dakr to do the pigs now anyway, so,

David Cameron to take on the Trades Unions! Bring the boxing-match on man!

We cant admit it and we’ll get put in prison for saying so, but everybodyknow that “trades Unions” have been subverted by the Gramsco left [on purpose as the Boss says, and it makes sense to do it for you’d win in a liberal society that’s kind and forgiving] to undermine and reverse the trend towards civilisatiion and prosperity for all. And to get it for those that threaten and fight most. Barbarians.

He’ll have to do it, but he’ll go down. Like that other guy. Not thatcher, he was a good guy.

At least Labour are honestly-statist scumbags


…llike Hugh Gaitskell who genuinely hated Anglosphere culture out of moral conviction (so Tony Benn loved him) and whom Margaret Thatcher most feared, out of all of them…(Wilson was just a Yezhov-policeman-imitation-character.)

…whereas David Cameron wants power so so so much that he can’t summon up the moral courage, the guardian-Angel-conscience, if you like, to cut and cut and cut again, and WIN the Party back to power!

David Davis

What “baby-George” George Osborne can do first of all, at about 02:00 am on the morning of a general-election win – IF they get one at all which is by no means assured as the Labour-scumbags will try to rig the results –  is this:-

(1) Lock-down and shut all “government buildings” containing such things as…

…”departments” of… education/skills/culture/women/communities/environment/farming/rural-affairs/more women/children-schools-and-families/media/sport/ diversity/health-protection-agency/UK-trade and investment/E-government-unit/Direct-gov(very very very sinister thing, this one!/The Greater London Authority/Info4local (whatever that might be?)/Better regulation Executive (even more sinister!)/UK resilience(er what?)/Department for work and pensions/Home Office Interior Ministry/Ministry of Justice (a tautology that one!)/Department for transport/ Department for regulatory reform (what’s the “better regulation executive” for then?)/Department for communities and local government/Department for children schools and families (this GramscoFabiaNazi government hates families and wants them dead, because they challenge its authority)/Department for comunities and local government (why is there another one?)

(2) Put all the “staff” on the street. Give them a bin-liner and 15 minutes to clear their desks and their lavatories of personal property.

(3) Burn ALL the records (and I include all hard disks, pen-drives, CD roms and servers) of all these departments. It must specifically include the pension records of all the people who have worked there. Otherwise there will become no stigma or even temporaray disadvantage attached to having worked for such places.




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