Tag Archives: language

Immigration – An Austro-Libertarian Analysis


Immigration – An Austro-Libertarian Analysis

By Duncan Whitmore

Both the referendum on Britain’s membership of the European Union and the election of Donald Trump as the US President have elevated the topic of immigration to the top of the political agenda. Leftist, liberal elites – previously so sure they would arrive easily at their vision of an open, borderless world – have been scalded now that the lid has been lifted from the bubbling cauldron of the needs of ordinary, everyday citizens seeking to preserve their jobs and the culture of their homelands.

It is high time that this vitriolic, divisive and – frankly – often quite tiresome issue is put to rest. That, alas, is unlikely to happen, particularly as the political globalists seem content to plough on with their vision of open borders through the looming UN Global Compact for Migration. Listening to the mainstream arguments (or at least to how the leftist/liberal media chooses to portray them), one would be forgiven for thinking that the immigration question needs to be met by an all or nothing answer – i.e. that it is either an unqualified good or an unqualified bad. We are led to believe that it is a contest between liberals, or self-styled “progressives”, clamouring for fully porous borders on the one hand, versus elderly, conservative, racist bigots who supposedly want to keep everyone out and preserve England’s green and pleasant land for white faces.

The falsehood of this dichotomy is obvious to almost anyone who is not of the liberal-left, and, in fact, a “sensible” view on immigration is quite prevalent – that it is possible to be in favour of permitted, but regulated immigration, allowing some people to cross the border as immigrants to come and live and work in the territory of the state while denying that privilege to others. It is also recognised that immigration is economically beneficial in some situations, but not in others – i.e. when immigrants are highly skilled and productive instead of welfare consumers.

The task of this essay is to sharpen this “sensible” view with Austro-libertarian theory. We will begin by outlining the core libertarian theory concerning immigration before examining a key area for contention among libertarians – whether, in a world populated by states, any particular state should restrict or otherwise control movements across the border by persons who are not considered to be citizens of that particular state and whether this is in accordance with libertarian theory. We will then move on to exploring the economic and cultural implications of immigration policies. Read more

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The Libertarian Alliance


David Davis

Now that this blog seems to be attracting attention from important people, I have taken certain steps regarding the comments.

No comment moderation is in place. But a robot now scans the entirety of all comments for certain keywords, the list of which may change on a one-time-pad basis, or it may not.

The Robot will decide whether to let such things on, or not, in ways which from time to time may vary.

This blog like others is private property. We are pleased to let people onto it, at our pleasure.

This will maximise the enjoyment that readers get out of it.

Taking offence: new service-industry entirely created by lawyers and Gramsco-Marxians, without any intellectual aids


David Davis

I don’t know if this will arrive today as WordPress seems (temporarily I hope) to have reverted to dial-up speeds. But hat tip to The landed Underclass for spotting this Michael Bywater article, which is so good it ought to go viral.

However, poor Bywater MUST learn, in true Gramsco-Libertarian fashion, NEVER EVER to refer, even laughingly, to the idea that Political Correctness may have “gone mad”. All this does is legitimise in the eyes of lookers-on the notion that political correctness has some basis in the morality of good-people – as opposed merely to being an ineffably wicked and premeditated construct of bad-people.

Yes. We may mock the pointless mountebank-intellectuals, Bandung-generation-hangers-on, and all the other associated useless-mouths and wastes-of-space – some with Kalashnikovs, some with DNA databases, some with surveillance camerae, some without any or all of these things –  who originally formulated the idea of PC. but WE must never forget how irremediably evil and wicked they are, and how and why they want to depopulate a world fit for them to live in as pre-capitalist barbarian neopastoralist murderers.

GOLLIGATE: Are people losing their fear of the PC thought-police?


David Davis

The Remittance Man thinks so. Trouble is, he currently resides in West Grombooliland. I wish I thought he was right, but I fear not. Most people today are I think silently aware of the awful powers these word-banning buggers have, increasingly, of being able to turn one’s life over in public, should one transgress their Gramsco-Marxian permitted-thought-boundaries.

To give Remittance Man his due, he does quote evidence of a “backlash”.

I fear that these days there are no longer what Chris Tame used to call, when he was alive, “enough people to make a difference”. There might have been, but the long-range Gramsco-Marxian thought-liberty-destruction project (it’s not a link yet but it might become one) has been very canny, cleverly underhand, and Fabian.

IT’S NOW A LINK

Its plan, of hauling up the ladder after a few hundred thousand (if that?) Honestiores, with all that paradise could provide for these and what some have called “their more useful servants”, is proceeding on schedule. This leaves the rest of humanity as Humiliores, dying while starving and freezing in the weapon-policed darkness of unelectricity, unfood, unlanguage and un-thought.

State “education” has now been reduced to rote-learning of PC paragraphs of stuff: ironically, “rote-learning” was what PC demonised.

The Wireless Tele Vision “News” broadcasts, to those who can’t be arsed, what they must learn.

The Enemy Class TV “producers” produce what these wretched people must enjoy.

Words that can express now-banned thoughts are increasingly criminalised.

Whole peoples, such as the English in particular – because we Showed The World The Way To The Unguarded Door Out Of Hell, are labelled “institutionally” (whatever that means?) racist/reactionary/ conservative/xenophobic/paedophile/homophobic/bigoted/mysogynist/male-chauvinist-pigs/substitute your own pejorative here.

I’m really not sure what to do about these people. I’d not like really to state on a public blog what the remedy ought to be. But there is little time left, before the terror-police kick in fully. There won’t be enough lamp-posts or time, when the time comes, anyway, so some other remedy will have to be found.

Destruction of words … to change the way children think


David Davis

Subj: [eurorealist] EDUCATION: THE ENEMY AT THE HELM
Date: 07/12/2008 17:20:48 GMT Standard Time
From: peter@pwwatson.co.uk
Reply-to: eurorealist@yahoogroups.com
To: eurorealist@yahoogroups.com, nick@cre.org.uk
Sent from the Internet (Details)

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/3569045/Words-associated-with-Christianity-and-British-history-taken-out-of-childrens-dictionary.html

TAKE THEIR CULTURE AND THEIR ROOTS AWAY AND YOU CAN BARCODE AND PROCESS THEM

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Words associated with Christianity and British history taken out of children’s dictionary

Words associated with Christianity, the monarchy and British history have been dropped from a leading dictionary for children.

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Westminster Abbey - Words associated with Christianity and British history taken out of children's dictionary

Westminster Abbey may be one of Britain’s most famous landmarks, but the word abbey has been removed from the Oxford Junior Dictionary. Photo: Dean and Chapter of Westminster

Oxford University Press has removed words like “aisle”, “bishop”, “chapel”, “empire” and “monarch” from its Junior Dictionary and replaced them with words like “blog”, “broadband” and “celebrity”. Dozens of words related to the countryside have also been culled.

The publisher claims the changes have been made to reflect the fact that Britain is a modern, multicultural, multifaith society.

But academics and head teachers said that the changes to the 10,000 word Junior Dictionary could mean that children lose touch with Britain’s heritage.

“We have a certain Christian narrative which has given meaning to us over the last 2,000 years. To say it is all relative and replaceable is questionable,” said Professor Alan Smithers, the director of the centre for education and employment at Buckingham University. “The word selections are a very interesting reflection of the way childhood is going, moving away from our spiritual background and the natural world and towards the world that information technology creates for us.”

An analysis of the word choices made by the dictionary lexicographers has revealed that entries from “abbey” to “willow” have been axed. Instead, words such as “MP3 player”, “voicemail” and “attachment” have taken their place.

Lisa Saunders, a worried mother who has painstakingly compared entries from the junior dictionaries, aimed at children aged seven or over, dating from 1978, 1995, 2000, 2002, 2003 and 2007, said she was “horrified” by the vast number of words that have been removed, most since 2003.

“The Christian faith still has a strong following,” she said. “To eradicate so many words associated with the Christianity will have a big effect on the numerous primary schools who use it.”

Ms Saunders realised words were being removed when she was helping her son with his homework and discovered that “moss” and “fern”, which were in editions up until 2003, were no longer listed.

“I decide to take a closer look and compare the new version to the other editions,” said the mother of four from Co Down, Northern Ireland. “I was completely horrified by the vast number of words which have been removed. We know that language moves on and we can’t be fuddy-duddy about it but you don’t cull hundreds of important words in order to get in a different set of ICT words.”

Anthony Seldon, the master of Wellington College, a leading private school in Berkshire, said: “I am stunned that words like “saint”, “buttercup”, “heather” and “sycamore” have all gone and I grieve it.

“I think as well as being descriptive, the Oxford Junior Dictionary, has to be prescriptive too, suggesting not just words that are used but words that should be used. It has a duty to keep these words within usage, not merely pander to an audience. We are looking at the loss of words of great beauty. I would rather have “marzipan” and “mistletoe” then “MP3 player.”

Oxford University Press, which produces the junior edition, selects words with the aid of the Children’s Corpus, a list of about 50 million words made up of general language, words from children’s books and terms related to the school curriculum. Lexicographers consider word frequency when making additions and deletions.

Vineeta Gupta, the head of children’s dictionaries at Oxford University Press, said: “We are limited by how big the dictionary can be – little hands must be able to handle it – but we produce 17 children’s dictionaries with different selections and numbers of words.

“When you look back at older versions of dictionaries, there were lots of examples of flowers for instance. That was because many children lived in semi-rural environments and saw the seasons. Nowadays, the environment has changed. We are also much more multicultural. People don’t go to Church as often as before. Our understanding of religion is within multiculturalism, which is why some words such as “Pentecost” or “Whitsun” would have been in 20 years ago but not now.”

She said children’s dictionaries were trailed in schools and advice taken from teachers. Many words are added to reflect the age-related school curriculum.

Words taken out:

Carol, cracker, holly, ivy, mistletoe

Dwarf, elf, goblin

Abbey, aisle, altar, bishop, chapel, christen, disciple, minister, monastery, monk, nun, nunnery, parish, pew, psalm, pulpit, saint, sin, devil, vicar

Coronation, duchess, duke, emperor, empire, monarch, decade

adder, ass, beaver, boar, budgerigar, bullock, cheetah, colt, corgi, cygnet, doe, drake, ferret, gerbil, goldfish, guinea pig, hamster, heron, herring, kingfisher, lark, leopard, lobster, magpie, minnow, mussel, newt, otter, ox, oyster, panther, pelican, piglet, plaice, poodle, porcupine, porpoise, raven, spaniel, starling, stoat, stork, terrapin, thrush, weasel, wren.

Acorn, allotment, almond, apricot, ash, bacon, beech, beetroot, blackberry, blacksmith, bloom, bluebell, bramble, bran, bray, bridle, brook, buttercup, canary, canter, carnation, catkin, cauliflower, chestnut, clover, conker, county, cowslip, crocus, dandelion, diesel, fern, fungus, gooseberry, gorse, hazel, hazelnut, heather, holly, horse chestnut, ivy, lavender, leek, liquorice, manger, marzipan, melon, minnow, mint, nectar, nectarine, oats, pansy, parsnip, pasture, poppy, porridge, poultry, primrose, prune, radish, rhubarb, sheaf, spinach, sycamore, tulip, turnip, vine, violet, walnut, willow

Words put in:

Blog, broadband, MP3 player, voicemail, attachment, database, export, chatroom, bullet point, cut and paste, analogue

Celebrity, tolerant, vandalism, negotiate, interdependent, creep, citizenship, childhood, conflict, common sense, debate, EU, drought, brainy, boisterous, cautionary tale, bilingual, bungee jumping, committee, compulsory, cope, democratic, allergic, biodegradable, emotion, dyslexic, donate, endangered, Euro

Apparatus, food chain, incisor, square number, trapezium, alliteration, colloquial, idiom, curriculum, classify, chronological, block graph

More about banning of Latin in everyday discourse, and British Soviet Stalinists’ attitudes to that


David Davis

Here’s Gerald Warner today. I also flagged up this pretentiously socialist rubbish now going on, a couple of days ago.

Gerald is especially good, and far better than me, about the importance and fundamemtalness of Latin (and by implication other languages from which we have extracted loan-words and grammar) in our language.

I add that the freedom of language underlies also the freedom of thought and (by inference) action, which we libertarians spend so much time banging on about. This publishing house is going great guns in especially Latin: I use their books (this is the Latin link in particular – get them!) to teach with in this language and have helped a couple of students already (it is a slow business, pulling the planet out of the Dark Ages despite the best efforts of ths Stalinists) and they are very traditionally-oriented and very good indeed. Order their stuff please.

Phone them if you want, on 01580 764242. I’m sure they take credit cards.

Additionally, if you are an extreme right-wing-fascist-imperialist-running-dog-of-the-boss-class-toff, and also a member of the Bullingdon, (only stalinists and people who can’t say “shibboleth” call it the “Bullingdon Club” so one knows in a NANOsecond whom to exclude and distrust – it’s like saying “horse-riding” when you mean “riding” on a horse which is the only thing you can do – you can’t ride a sheep, can you) which is to say most libertarians if they are honest about themselves and their political anticedents (liberal-left-lower-class-grammar-school-type-boys-made-good), then you might like Harry Mount’s book.

Ahhhhhhh….so that’s it then. How stupid of us not to see it….


David Davis

The continual and extending sexualisation of free-people’s children was written about earlier on here. Now, Trooper has made the connection with earlier but still fairly modern fascist Utopian literature on the subject, which could give us reasons why our children are all being sexualised by the State.

This may or may not have anything to do with why I, running this blog, now find it useful to outreach previously un-libertarianised groups in British society and elsewhere, such as young British men.

There’s nothing wrong with sex. I even agree with the horrible Paul Ehrlich that it’s nice. It is the reward, programmed into the operation of our bodies, and contrived from first principles for us by our genes, for us being successfully able to pass them on before we fry. They (our genes) are toast, otherwise. Er, that’s why it’s nice. Otherwise we wouldn’t be programmed to spend time working out obessively how to do it with someone.

But what he forgets is that the tragedy of civilisation, language, morality and goodness versus evil has crept into the woodwork. Matter has at last reached the state of consciousness where it contemplates its own existence, its origin, its possible fate, and what it ought to do in the meantime.

Thank God I still dont look like that,

Thank God I don't yet look like that...He's had too much sex, clearly. (Terrible hands.)

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