Tag Archives: medicine

Universal Healthcare – an Economic Disaster


Given the recent announcement of a new, long term plan for the NHS it seems like an opportune moment to revisit the topic of universal healthcare. The essay below is a new version of a previously published piece, with some sections revised and elaborated, while figures and references have been updated.

Universal Healthcare – an Economic Disaster

By Duncan Whitmore

“Universal healthcare” (that is, an alleged “right” to “healthcare” provided in some form by the state) is a mainstay of social democratic thought – so much so, in fact, that the UK’s NHS is taken as a given, with any kind of proposed healthcare reform couched in terms of improving “our” state-funded health service rather than ever considering whether it should exist in the first place.

However the consequences of universal healthcare are grave indeed, including spiralling costs and ever increasing numbers of sick – pretty much the effects of the welfare state in general. This is without even considering the ethics of forcibly confiscating the money of one person to benefit another, although this essay will focus on the economic aspects of what is, in effect, the socialisation of medicine. Read more

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Meanwhile, in the Nissen-Hut, working out the subtext of this message


David Davis

“Ministers will say” that “the professions” should “stop recruiting young people in private education”.

I’m not sure what the duty-Chimpanzee type writers dislike more: the notion that the governmentists will “say” that people who have paid twice for their children’s education must now get nothing at all, or that this “government” has decided that it is a set of farmers, who farm animals called “The Middle Class”, that can be farmed for taxation-revenue as required by varying the size of said farm.

Swine Flu : and good days to bury bad news underneath people from near Gordon Brown


David Davis

I’m sure that this unlucky couple did not set out with the particular intention of getting whatever ordinary kind of typically-rapidly-mutating-flu-virus “swine flu” is, but it’s quite convenient for the Sub-Prime-Minister that they come from somewhere a little bit near his constituency. A lot is designed to be made of this matter, you just watch.

This is going to be a good day for the guvmint to bury something less unexciting, which we ought to watch out for. More laws probably. Perhaps something to do with traffic lights?

Hat tip the lefty-torygraph. High time that the blogosphere started sending the Dead Tree Press some traffic.

And here we go! Here’s the Dead Treet Press, swinging in behind the best-placed-minister. The MailyDail is even better! Attaguys at the Express!  I can’t believe this is happening to me, i am being assailed by MSM and State-warnings about a moderately harmless virus…those who have something to hide, have something to fear. And Obama might die of it, so we’re all f****d then….

Oh well, this was the bad news obviously.

Charles is a crank, and astonishingly unfit to be Head of State, but it’s no reason to scrag his outfit over his dodgy herbal remedies, if people want to waste their own money.


Caveat Emptor…

David Davis

This caught my eye just now, and I for one am always pleased to see overpriced and no-better-than-the-competition stuff get egged and floured.

However, there are some principles going on here. In may cases we don’t _really_ know if stuff like Hypericum extract, or “dandelion tincture” have any effect on snything or not. It’s most probable in the face of decades of evidence that they don’t, with the possible exception of things like willow bark extract (for pre-aspirin-like compounds.)

But if people wish to spend their money this way, the ought to be allowed to, and the seller perhaps ought to be allowed to tell them what he thinks the gear does. If it does not, they will stop buying it, and if enough do, he will go bust or delete the brand. Problem solved.

And this sentence was wonderful:-

Similarly Duchy Herbals Echina-Relief Tincture is a “traditional herbal medicinal product used to relive  (sic) the symptoms of the common cold and influenza type infections.”

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