Tag Archives: Parliament

Church, King and State – Decentralisation and Liberty


Church, King and State – Decentralisation and Liberty

By Duncan Whitmore

Introduction

It scarcely needs to be said that life as a libertarian theorist and political activist is an often isolated and lonely existence. Even though we often have the evidence to illustrate that we are correct, our ideas are ridiculed, if they are ever listened to in the first place. While “free-marketism” from the point of view of generating “economic efficiency” enjoys a seat at the table of the mainstream and may, depending upon the circumstances, disseminate views which are taken seriously by the highest echelons of government, radical libertarianism does not. We are a bare minority of extremist nutcases, deluded by the romantic fairytale vision of the industrial greatness of the nineteenth century, the reality of which, we are told, meant spoils for the rich and destitution for the masses. Our intellectual heroes are derided as dogmatic crackpots who would do away with all of the civilising achievements of our social democratic world order and consign us all instead to a vigilante society reminiscent of the “wild west”.

Having said of all of this, the endeavour to justify libertarian principles is only a small part of the battle. In fact, the biggest difficulty in such justification is not in crafting high quality arguments that will consign statism and socialism to the intellectual rubbish heap. Rather, it is the fact that the die is so heavily weighted in favour of statism, and that the willingness to accept any kind of confirmation bias, however minute, for the status quo is so eager, that even if one was armed with a fortress of insurmountable libertarian arguments the debate could still be lost. No doubt many libertarian has been in the position of having taken a horse to water only to find that he will not drink – and that, sadly, we must be prepared to wait for him to realise that he is dying of thirst. Read more

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No use voting Tory, Sean, not really, not any more


David Davis

Sean Gabb, on this column, bravely defended the position that we ought to vote Tory this time, to give us just a little more time before fully-sliding down into the eternal cesspool of the socialist Endarkenment. Something might turn up: you cannot know unless we could try it. It could be worth the candle, the game could. A few more years to organise, under a State that won’t, probably, actually turn its police’s guns on its own people.

But now we have this. And indeed, when you watch Gordon Brown at PM’s questions, he really does seem like a fighter whho truly believes what he is saying, and who truly believe in the unutterably-irrevocable wickedness of the Tories and others, any others, that oppose him and his. You can see how Simon-Cowell-educated people will wamr to him and will tend to vote for him.

We are truly f****d. But hopefully the setting-in of the true rot will take some time. However, knowledge still exists in distributed form, and we can ameliorate the effects of civilisational decay (barring violence and fire) over the years and decades.

It looks like we have to go down to the bottom, before we can go up. Like the poor Germans. So we might as well vote for whoever pleases us.

Sion Simon sees the light


Michael Winning

I always thought this man was a class-A1-lackey-and-running-dog-of-the-new-political-boss-class, since he made such a prat of himslef on some Newsprog or other, here:-

On this blog here and there the Boss mkaes reference to MPs possibly not being paid at all. I agree that they ought only to think about  “entering parliament”, as they used to call it – at a time of life when they can afford to support themsleves while doing public good by refusing to legislate hysterically about everything.

MPs expenses…the new brief is to bankrupt the Tories (and UKIP as a side-order) while you still can, while letting the GramscoFabiaNazis off with a slap on the wrist


David Davis

Bernard Jenkin (I thought he’d died years ago, I really did, I thought he was some sort of B-movie-comedian or something) is the subject of the Daily GramscoMirror’s ire today***, over an “eyewatering £63,250”. Yup, it really is. Eyewatering I mean.

One law for them.

And Tony McNulty (who’s that? How can you give a job as a politician to someone called “Tony”?) can “keep the £60,000”.

Another law for us.

***Through a Glass, Dully.

…and MPs: preparing the world for hegemony


David Davis

The problem of an existing Enemy-Class, and – as a corollary to that – its tendency to Bathe its Hands in the Till, will continue until a revolution in the way individuls view “public service” is accomplished.

In London, at the Libertarian Alliance Conference last weekend, my boy and I, walking about Pimlico in the company of the admirable Brian Micklethwait, spied a number of quite utilitarian but suitable buildings for the battery-housing of MPs. Nothing fancy, just serviceable, warm, fairly comfortable and presumably facilities to make coffee, get up some toasty-cheese sandwiches and tea-without-sugar early before a brisk trot to the House, power the odd electric blanket in winter, and watch “Question Time” if they had to. (But they can’t, because I’ll make them be in the House…for all debates…all the time. And they won’t be able to “claim” for a “VCR machine” because I’ll opine that they ought to be able to afford one already.)

The expenses row gets better: now the bastards are whingeing that they can’t employ their wives or claim for mortgages. Look, if they didn’t think they could afford to be MPs, why ever did they stand at all? Anyway, I thought the point of being an MP away in London is that you could shag your “researcher”? She/he might hope to be your wife in due course, but that was under the Tories: we have moved on now, this is 2010, sonny.

MPs should “enter Parliament” only  _after_  they have had a comprehensive education in reality and proper work, and in living like the people who will be employing them. That might mean they are all conservatives – with a small “c” –  and are cynical and pessimistic about what good the State can do, if even any at all. But that’s good, surely. It will end once and for all the cultural hegemony in modern British politics of the fascist-lefty, professional-activist-Gramscian, all of whose influences have been entirely malign and without any redeeming features at all. These people were only good for acting as Pol Pot’s murderers, and have now truly become what they always were.

Incidentally, I have been politely and informally approached by Various August Libertarians, regarding my use of the term “GramscoFabiaNazi”. As a result I explained, perhaps a bit too forcefully and with a little too high conviction, not only what this term means which they fully understood, but why it is 100% accurate and will continue to be applied at appropriate points, and why it should gain traction. Thus there will be a short digression soon, and I will pen an essay to justify the word intellectually, which will be on here. But I will continue unfailingly to be the eternal foe of these bad, bad, wicked, evil sub-humanoid murderers (who deserve the punishment defined as “Eternal Life” [I explained this OK, didn’t I?] ), and I will call the GFNs names and throw insults at them to the end of my strength keyboard.

But for MPs, who clearly do understand the problem but whose grasp of delightful power now exceeds the reach of morals by so much that they can find the brass-neck to protest at the protestations against them? They may find that in the end, we the People “have not the facilities to properly take their surrender”. They better watch out.

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