Tag Archives: words

GOLLIGATE: Are people losing their fear of the PC thought-police?


David Davis

The Remittance Man thinks so. Trouble is, he currently resides in West Grombooliland. I wish I thought he was right, but I fear not. Most people today are I think silently aware of the awful powers these word-banning buggers have, increasingly, of being able to turn one’s life over in public, should one transgress their Gramsco-Marxian permitted-thought-boundaries.

To give Remittance Man his due, he does quote evidence of a “backlash”.

I fear that these days there are no longer what Chris Tame used to call, when he was alive, “enough people to make a difference”. There might have been, but the long-range Gramsco-Marxian thought-liberty-destruction project (it’s not a link yet but it might become one) has been very canny, cleverly underhand, and Fabian.

IT’S NOW A LINK

Its plan, of hauling up the ladder after a few hundred thousand (if that?) Honestiores, with all that paradise could provide for these and what some have called “their more useful servants”, is proceeding on schedule. This leaves the rest of humanity as Humiliores, dying while starving and freezing in the weapon-policed darkness of unelectricity, unfood, unlanguage and un-thought.

State “education” has now been reduced to rote-learning of PC paragraphs of stuff: ironically, “rote-learning” was what PC demonised.

The Wireless Tele Vision “News” broadcasts, to those who can’t be arsed, what they must learn.

The Enemy Class TV “producers” produce what these wretched people must enjoy.

Words that can express now-banned thoughts are increasingly criminalised.

Whole peoples, such as the English in particular – because we Showed The World The Way To The Unguarded Door Out Of Hell, are labelled “institutionally” (whatever that means?) racist/reactionary/ conservative/xenophobic/paedophile/homophobic/bigoted/mysogynist/male-chauvinist-pigs/substitute your own pejorative here.

I’m really not sure what to do about these people. I’d not like really to state on a public blog what the remedy ought to be. But there is little time left, before the terror-police kick in fully. There won’t be enough lamp-posts or time, when the time comes, anyway, so some other remedy will have to be found.

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Sean Gabb on the BBC re Carol Thatcher


http://www.libertarian.co.uk/multimedia/2009-02-04-sig-thatcher.mp3

Should the BBC have sacked Carol Thatcher because she said in a private conversation that someone looked like a golliwog? No, says Sean Gabb, Director of the Libertarian Alliance.  Jo Brand was investigated by the police for allegedly inciting violence on BBC 1 against her political opponents. Carol Thatcher used a word. One gets the sack, the other the BBC’s unconditional support. But, then, Jo Brand is part of the New Labour Establishment. Carol Thatcher is the daughter of a Prime Minister who still makes the ruling class shudder.

Destruction of words … to change the way children think


David Davis

Subj: [eurorealist] EDUCATION: THE ENEMY AT THE HELM
Date: 07/12/2008 17:20:48 GMT Standard Time
From: peter@pwwatson.co.uk
Reply-to: eurorealist@yahoogroups.com
To: eurorealist@yahoogroups.com, nick@cre.org.uk
Sent from the Internet (Details)

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/3569045/Words-associated-with-Christianity-and-British-history-taken-out-of-childrens-dictionary.html

TAKE THEIR CULTURE AND THEIR ROOTS AWAY AND YOU CAN BARCODE AND PROCESS THEM

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Words associated with Christianity and British history taken out of children’s dictionary

Words associated with Christianity, the monarchy and British history have been dropped from a leading dictionary for children.

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Westminster Abbey - Words associated with Christianity and British history taken out of children's dictionary

Westminster Abbey may be one of Britain’s most famous landmarks, but the word abbey has been removed from the Oxford Junior Dictionary. Photo: Dean and Chapter of Westminster

Oxford University Press has removed words like “aisle”, “bishop”, “chapel”, “empire” and “monarch” from its Junior Dictionary and replaced them with words like “blog”, “broadband” and “celebrity”. Dozens of words related to the countryside have also been culled.

The publisher claims the changes have been made to reflect the fact that Britain is a modern, multicultural, multifaith society.

But academics and head teachers said that the changes to the 10,000 word Junior Dictionary could mean that children lose touch with Britain’s heritage.

“We have a certain Christian narrative which has given meaning to us over the last 2,000 years. To say it is all relative and replaceable is questionable,” said Professor Alan Smithers, the director of the centre for education and employment at Buckingham University. “The word selections are a very interesting reflection of the way childhood is going, moving away from our spiritual background and the natural world and towards the world that information technology creates for us.”

An analysis of the word choices made by the dictionary lexicographers has revealed that entries from “abbey” to “willow” have been axed. Instead, words such as “MP3 player”, “voicemail” and “attachment” have taken their place.

Lisa Saunders, a worried mother who has painstakingly compared entries from the junior dictionaries, aimed at children aged seven or over, dating from 1978, 1995, 2000, 2002, 2003 and 2007, said she was “horrified” by the vast number of words that have been removed, most since 2003.

“The Christian faith still has a strong following,” she said. “To eradicate so many words associated with the Christianity will have a big effect on the numerous primary schools who use it.”

Ms Saunders realised words were being removed when she was helping her son with his homework and discovered that “moss” and “fern”, which were in editions up until 2003, were no longer listed.

“I decide to take a closer look and compare the new version to the other editions,” said the mother of four from Co Down, Northern Ireland. “I was completely horrified by the vast number of words which have been removed. We know that language moves on and we can’t be fuddy-duddy about it but you don’t cull hundreds of important words in order to get in a different set of ICT words.”

Anthony Seldon, the master of Wellington College, a leading private school in Berkshire, said: “I am stunned that words like “saint”, “buttercup”, “heather” and “sycamore” have all gone and I grieve it.

“I think as well as being descriptive, the Oxford Junior Dictionary, has to be prescriptive too, suggesting not just words that are used but words that should be used. It has a duty to keep these words within usage, not merely pander to an audience. We are looking at the loss of words of great beauty. I would rather have “marzipan” and “mistletoe” then “MP3 player.”

Oxford University Press, which produces the junior edition, selects words with the aid of the Children’s Corpus, a list of about 50 million words made up of general language, words from children’s books and terms related to the school curriculum. Lexicographers consider word frequency when making additions and deletions.

Vineeta Gupta, the head of children’s dictionaries at Oxford University Press, said: “We are limited by how big the dictionary can be – little hands must be able to handle it – but we produce 17 children’s dictionaries with different selections and numbers of words.

“When you look back at older versions of dictionaries, there were lots of examples of flowers for instance. That was because many children lived in semi-rural environments and saw the seasons. Nowadays, the environment has changed. We are also much more multicultural. People don’t go to Church as often as before. Our understanding of religion is within multiculturalism, which is why some words such as “Pentecost” or “Whitsun” would have been in 20 years ago but not now.”

She said children’s dictionaries were trailed in schools and advice taken from teachers. Many words are added to reflect the age-related school curriculum.

Words taken out:

Carol, cracker, holly, ivy, mistletoe

Dwarf, elf, goblin

Abbey, aisle, altar, bishop, chapel, christen, disciple, minister, monastery, monk, nun, nunnery, parish, pew, psalm, pulpit, saint, sin, devil, vicar

Coronation, duchess, duke, emperor, empire, monarch, decade

adder, ass, beaver, boar, budgerigar, bullock, cheetah, colt, corgi, cygnet, doe, drake, ferret, gerbil, goldfish, guinea pig, hamster, heron, herring, kingfisher, lark, leopard, lobster, magpie, minnow, mussel, newt, otter, ox, oyster, panther, pelican, piglet, plaice, poodle, porcupine, porpoise, raven, spaniel, starling, stoat, stork, terrapin, thrush, weasel, wren.

Acorn, allotment, almond, apricot, ash, bacon, beech, beetroot, blackberry, blacksmith, bloom, bluebell, bramble, bran, bray, bridle, brook, buttercup, canary, canter, carnation, catkin, cauliflower, chestnut, clover, conker, county, cowslip, crocus, dandelion, diesel, fern, fungus, gooseberry, gorse, hazel, hazelnut, heather, holly, horse chestnut, ivy, lavender, leek, liquorice, manger, marzipan, melon, minnow, mint, nectar, nectarine, oats, pansy, parsnip, pasture, poppy, porridge, poultry, primrose, prune, radish, rhubarb, sheaf, spinach, sycamore, tulip, turnip, vine, violet, walnut, willow

Words put in:

Blog, broadband, MP3 player, voicemail, attachment, database, export, chatroom, bullet point, cut and paste, analogue

Celebrity, tolerant, vandalism, negotiate, interdependent, creep, citizenship, childhood, conflict, common sense, debate, EU, drought, brainy, boisterous, cautionary tale, bilingual, bungee jumping, committee, compulsory, cope, democratic, allergic, biodegradable, emotion, dyslexic, donate, endangered, Euro

Apparatus, food chain, incisor, square number, trapezium, alliteration, colloquial, idiom, curriculum, classify, chronological, block graph